Site Projects 1980-1986

Collection of Museum of Modern Art, New York, Los Angeles, County Museum of Art and other instittuions

Tideline 1981
Tideline 1981
Ellipse Tide Drawing 1982
Ellipse Tide Drawing 1982
Ellipse Tide 1982
Ellipse Tide 1982
Ellipse Tide (version 2) 1982
Ellipse Tide (version 2) 1982
Wave System Drawing 1983
Wave System Drawing 1983
Wave System 1983
Wave System 1983
Tideline 2 Drawing 1984
Tideline 2 Drawing 1984
Tideline 2  1984
Tideline 2 1984
Quadrant 1  1981
Quadrant 1 1981
Quadrant 2 Drawing 1981
Quadrant 2 Drawing 1981
Quadrant 2  1982
Quadrant 2 1982
Quadrant 3  1984
Quadrant 3 1984
Quadrant 3 1984
Quadrant 3 1984
Quadrant 4 1985
Quadrant 4 1985
Activation 1981
Activation 1981
Dune Walk 1981
Dune Walk 1981
Alignment 1983
Alignment 1983
Four Chambered House Drawing 1982
Four Chambered House Drawing 1982
Four Chambered House 1982
Four Chambered House 1982
Contact 1983
Contact 1983
Drawing for IRAS Araki-Alcott Comet   1984
Drawing for IRAS Araki-Alcott Comet 1984
Fallen Star   1984
Fallen Star 1984
Beacon
1983
Beacon
1983
Axis 1985
Axis 1985
Observatory 1984
Observatory 1984
Das Waldsterben 1984
Das Waldsterben 1984
Collector 1984
Collector 1984
Parallel Structures 1985
Parallel Structures 1985
Gnosis: Knowing/Dwelling
1985
Gnosis: Knowing/Dwelling
1985
Temple  1986
Temple 1986
Forest 1986
Forest 1986

The Site Projects were the step between the purely photographic work of the late 70’s and early 80’s and the sculpture and installations that took precedent by 1989. The work is a philosophical response to “earthworks” sculptors like Smithson, Heizer and DeMaria. What issue was taken of these earthworks, were the destructive process: bulldozers marked and moved the earth to serve metaphorical purposes. The Site Projects used the site as a stage that left a dwindling trace of physical work there. An added temporal element that echoes in many works that take place during long camera exposures at night. These works deal with notions of power and scale; like Chinese landscapes, these works compared the scale of the human against the overarching embrace of the world, the stars and the galaxies.



Most projects began with drawings, some formalized instructions that could be reengaged at a later date or by the artist or others. This was in part, a response to the ephemeral nature of color print photography at the time. Now these works can be translated digitally and placed on paper with pigments for permanent display. The desired print size of the work has also grown over the years, starting at 18” x 18” and ending at 30” x 30” sometime in the early 1990’s.